The Knit Knack's Blog

Better living through fibre


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A Swallowtail Happy

The word Swallowtail means something to most knitters.  It’s an Evelyn Clark small triangle shawl design that has gone viral.  There are 9,543 projects on Ravelry, and now I understand why!  This cone of red Habu Tsumugi silk yarn never even hit the stash!

The heap of magenta is a project that only Melvin is enjoying very much – the Laar Cardigan by Gudrun Johnston.  More on that is to come in a future post.

Initially, I cast-on for another Evelyn Clark pattern, the Prairie Rose Lace Shawl from the Knitter’s Book of Wool.  That was more of an exercise in swatching the Habu, and I soon went for the Swallowtail.

All I could hear was Teresa’s voice saying, “You totally should make one!”  Which Teresa?  The one who made no less than 5 of those Ravelry projects.

I settled on using my 3.0 mm lace Addi turbo needles.  My system for working with the nubby Habu silk was:

  • Pants – smooth not grabby;
  • Lap cloth – lingerie, repurposed; and
  • Lazy kate – the Will Taylor tulip kate kept the cone & my sanity upright.

It went on the needles February 8th & came off on the 25th.  I really like the pattern, and the sweet challenge was working my first mirrored border.  With the yarn managed, I found it went very quickly.  All other projects were set aside!

For my Lily of the Valley border, I substituted orange Toho 8/0 seed beads for the Estonian nupps (think bobble).  I used a tiny 0.6mm crochet hook, and added them on the right side.  The edging is also beaded but on the wrong side of each double decrease.

The beads showed well even before blocking (but not so well on the flannel sheet).

As soon as he saw the beads on the tray table, N said, “Now you’re happy!”  He was right!  For all the extra manipulation, placing beads gives the shawl weight, dimension & highlights the pattern.

So, Ms. Teresa:  when we see each other again, I will be wearing a Silk Swallowtail!  Thinking of you this week & get well soon.  Lace knitting & pilates to follow, right?!


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Not Child’s Play, it’s a Flax Wheel!

A few weeks ago, I stumbled across a Kijiji ad:  Antique Child’s Spinning Wheel.  Just 2 pics but it looked doable in terms of price, and location.

After lots of searching, I decided that it is a flax saxony spinning wheel, probably brought here by an Eastern European family.  The Antique Spinning Wheels Ravelry group also helped calm my fears that she was going to turn out to be a sad little Frankenwheel.

Naturally, I was doing this all in secret.  DH’s first reaction?  He may have asked, “Where will you put it?” but he soon rallied.

That Saturday we braved the snow & headed out to Uxbridge.  The seller was unconvinced that the wheel was used by grown women but she did like that I wanted to get her spinning again.  Even I was stunned by the tiny size when we walked in.  It’s just 2′ high at the maidens, and fits this place mat exactly:

Even Melvin fits!  The hinges are leather, and the treadle is practically made for my size 7 foot.  I worked on the wheel that first weekend, and gave her a Murphy’s Soap bath followed by plenty of tung oil, a new front leather, and pegs for everywhere.  The spa treatment went fairly quickly but I sought help on Ravelry to get her fully functional.

See the massive chip in the bobbin?  It unscrewed easily but the flyer shaft was very rusty.  WD-40 scoured and left overnight did help… a bit.

This flyer probably never had hooks or nails but the spinner would move an eyelet peg along the holes.  The back holes show much more wear.

The ‘Proof of Spin’ pic also shows my fix for the pegs.  Like the steam punk?  Reed Needles aka Wheelwright on Rav does too!

Woodworms made their mark in the mother-of-all housing.  I worried it would need shoring up but all has been well through spinning 1.5 bobbins of BFL wool.

The important thing is that the screw tension is totally undamaged and moves well.

Is it rude to look under a slanty’s skirts?

Don’t carve leather with a buck knife and expect to come away unscathed.  It took some shaving but now the flyer moves freely.  I kept the old leather… it was very badly worn wide.

The drive wheel crank is one of my favourite things about this wheel.  Small but perfectly formed.

Maybe the nail got hammered in after the top of the distaff went missing?

Melvin has been positively doting about the wheel.  It’s not just that he wants to get in on the action.

I named the wheel Chella because it reminds me so much of my Grandmother’s older sister who never married but loved crafts.  It took a few tries to get the right drive band – the purple Hempathy.  I absolutely love this wheel.  She’s a good spinner, and the low profile is ace for tv watching.  The paint on all sides is adorable & I am dying to try to spin line flax with her.