From the spindle jar – Targhee wool when clubs are so good

An arrangement of multiple drop and supported spindles in three containers on a concrete mantle with red brick fireplace surround.  The jar to the left is white with a cable knit relief pattern and red rim.  This jar is medium sized and 4 top-whorl spindles, 1 mid-whorl spindle is in the jar.  The middle jar is aqua fading to neutral glaze with a wide mouth.  One Kundert top-whorl spindle is to the right, 2 Peruvian low-whorl spindles and a supported spindle are in the jar.  The ring of a Golding drop spindle is behind grey fibre.  A smaller creamer is to the right with two coin takhlis that have corks protecting the tips, and three top-whorl spindles.  A bamboo box with cotton punis, a singles ball is in front of the creamer.  A blue Care Bear is in front of the white jar and small assorted objects are also on the mantle including a hand-wound outer-pull ball of grey wool.
End of June 2020 coping with spindles situation

The extreme left spindle is featured in this post. It is a Bosworth ‘skinny midi’ in Blue Mahoe that weighs 22 g/ 0.77 oz. I had just cleared a 27 g ball, and was continuing the spin of 8 oz of Targhee wool from Sheepy Time Knits Hobbit Club, “The Water.”

You can’t see it very well there, can you? A first TKK post on this spinning project is here.

Left to right laid on a blue and white mosaic square tile side table in front of a green lawn is:  a braid of handpainted Targhee wool in blue and teal shades; 4 twisted skeins of fine three-ply handspun Targhee yarn in shades of a lighter blue; a top-whorl Bosworth drop-spindle with a cop of royal blue Targhee wool hanspun yarn and the working fibre to the top left of the whorl
Other Targhee; “The Water” handspun yarns, and current Targhee on the Blue Mahoe Bossie spindle

It continued just as I shared in the first post, i.e. spin the Blue Mahoe until full; wind-off to a singles ball; repeat. Starting in February 2019, I made 3-strand plying balls. I used a turned Peruvian Pushka (low-whorl spindle) for plying. The total yarn is around 992 yards of 3-ply yarn.

Close to 1,000 yards at this weight is a good start. It is likely short of a sweater quantity & also for weaving without additional yarn. I am thinking of ways to best use the gorgeous yarn.

A braid of hand-dyed royal blue Targhee wool lies on a light wood table behind a Bosworth top-whorl drop spindle in Blue Mahoe wood with the start of spinning on the cop.  The spindle is laying horizontally in front of the horizontal braid of fibre and the hook, top-whorl are to the left with working fibre also to the left away from the whorl.
“Madam Vice-President” Targhee wool arrives in the mail, and out comes the Blue Mahoe spindle!

When this braid of Targhee wool top came from Sheepy Time Knits (Female Heroes club, January 2021), I reached for the same Bossie. Why? I liked spinning Mandie’s Targhee this way. the saturated royal blue was great for deep wintertime, and I am homesick.

A Bosworth top-whorl drop spindle is on a weathered log of Norway maple.  The yarn is wound in a cone-shape on the shaft of the spindle with a length of hand-dyed working fibre that is royal blue Targhee wool combed top is to the upper right of the spindle on the log.  The spindle is resting next to a cavity in the log that extends from the top of the log down to the end of the wound cop.  The spindle is resting at a slight angle and its shadow is cast to the right on the log.
Almost full in mid-March 2021

The connection for home with Blue Mahoe, Hibiscus elatus, as Jamaica’s national tree got boosted by the theme, “Madam Vice-President.” The 49th Vice-President of the United States is the daughter of a Jamaican-American, Donald Harris who is from Brown’s Town, St. Ann.

Two outer-pull balls of handspun Targhee wool singles by irieknit are dyed a saturated royal blue and rest in a small pea-pod shaped painted ceramic bowl that is white on the outside with green rim.  The bowl is laid diagonally on a mosaic tile table with blue and white square tiles and a pewter mug with handle is behind the bowl.
Each ball of Targhee singles weighs just over 20 g (21 g; 23g)

It has been a good fit, and I am leaning towards keeping a 3-ply plan for these singles balls. They may flow better with “The Water” skeins if I vary the plies with Targhee top from deep stash. It is the braid in the 2nd image above, far left.

If not, they can stand on their own as separate projects. Sampling will give the answers!

The takeaways are two-fold. First, you can do a lot with a single spindle. Second, year-over-year, Mandie has provided spinners with really good clubs. This post is a nod to the hard work that it takes to reliably deliver this level of excellence even in such challenging times.

A skein of handspun royal blue Polwarth/silk yarn by irieknit handdyed by Sheepy Time Knits is tied and twisted on a small wood tray with a slatted bottom and gingerbread-style cut sides.
“Madam Vice President” in Polwarth/ Tussah silk

One advantage of a club is that you may re-order a colourway on another base. The longer-term spin can have a shorter-term outlet too. This 85% Polwarth wool/15% Tussah silk in the same colourway is 233 yards (3.7 ounces) spun quickly on my Watson Martha wheel in double drive tension, plied on the Spinolution Mach 2.

It also tickled me that Ty was so impressed by these deliveries that I took him to Mandie’s club page, and explained about female heroes.

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Lara is a spinner, knitter, natural dyer, parent abandoning a certain fear of weaving. Jamaican-Canadian; she/her in the Greater Toronto Area; we have a Jellicle cat, Melvin & a Double Doodle, Spark. A spindle is usually close to hand!

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