The Knit Knack's Blog

my handspinning, knitting, natural dye, weaving fibre home


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Newly minted knits

This post is going to read like an Ode to the Colour Purple no matter how much or little I go into the details.  It is my happy place.

Irieknit Ampersand socks in Indigodragonfly handdyed merino yarn

Project Purple Toes

A few months ago, I shared about this nice act of aeroplane knitting.  This is the late-breaking progress picture!

irieknit Ampersand sock in progress Indigodragonfly handdyed yarn

My gauge with  2.25 mm Dyakcraft needles is a snug 36 stitches = 4″ in pattern.  The cast-on worked out at 72 cuff stitches.  I pared the stitch repeat down by 3 stitches, and it still plays so nicely with this hand-painted yarn.

Finished irieknit Ampersand socks in Indigodragonfly handdyed yarn

Very January appropriate

Last Saturday was the finish date for these socks, and I wore them immediately!  The extended ribs are not on centre but I like them lots.  The legs are 7″ long (3″ added), and I used 99g from the 115g skein.

The matchy-matchy new cardigan

Another new FO on the block this week is my Something Silver cardigan.  Naturally, I called the project ‘Something Purple.’

irieknit Something Silver cardigan in Elsebeth Lavold Silky Wool overdyed logwood

Pockets! Purple!

Not only does this cardigan offer the all-over half diamond single lines of lace that are easy to follow but the garter stitch band conceals pockets.

Rear view irieknit Something Silver cardigan in Silky Wool overdyed logwood

As I have been chatting with my friend Sarah, the garter stitch neckline is pretty deep.  If I had more yarn it would have gone towards an applied i-cord (or two) for that area.

This lived with me on & even briefly off the needles from August 20, 2014 – January 28, 2015.

Irieknit overdye Elsebeth Lavold yarn with natural logwood exhaust bath

Natural dye magic: logwood

 

This really is a good news story about over-dyeing a commercial yarn.  It came to me as colourway 12 ‘dusty rose’ on the left there.  Then it entered my exhaust bath of logwood chips in January 2013!  There are flicks of deep pink in the yarn, and I love how it gives my cardigan a heathered effect.

The ensemble is made

Speaking of logwood, I had another dye session that took my breath away back in June 2013.  This is my Harvey Columbia wool yarn spun on the CPW.  All-time favourite shade, Yes!

Handdyed Columbia wool handspun yarn with logwood

Logwood and her BFF Columbia wool handspun yarn

The 4-ply woolen-spun yarn weighed 210 g when dry.  I re-used an alum pot to pre-mordant, and let the yarn cool overnight in the prepared dyebath.   It was an old logwood pot, and I added 20g of  fresh chips.

Melvin occupies Columbia wool basket with Cadorette Canadian Production spinning wheel

Right under my nose!

Melvin decided to have a say in this yarn’s fibre content.  It was spun on my Philias Cadorette CPW, and plied on the Spinolution MachII at 5:1 for 247 yards of 4-ply yarn.

Handspun Columbia 4-ply wool yarn by irieknit

Yarn before her adventures with logwood

Scale is important for understanding the project this went into, so bear with me.

The handspun yarn measured 10 wraps per inch on my spinner’s control card or in the worsted-weight range.  It is 494 yards per pound.  This is much heavier than a millspun worsted-weight yarn, which is 800 yards per pound.  That difference showed in my project.

Irieknit Pinion Tam in handspun Columbia wool 4-ply yarn dyed with logwood

My baby Pinion Tam

The pattern is Pinion by Naomi Parkhurst, and it calls for 110 yards of worsted-weight yarn.  These are my 5.0 mm needles.  The swatch was honest- I needed 2 less stitches to knit 4″ in stockinette than the pattern called for.

Irieknit handspun Columbia wool knitted Pinion Tam blocking

Blocking my handspun Pinion

My tam has a sharper decrease section, and I decreased 8 extra stitches after doing the math for the brim.

Changing down a needle size to 4.5 mm helped to make the brim smaller, and I also modified the ribbing for more elasticity.  Mine is K, [P, K]* x 3, P3.

At its widest we are 3″ larger diameter than Naomi’s pattern or 13″.  Luckily, I had a big enough plate for the wet blocking!  It used 153 yards of the yarn.

We haven’t taken any final pictures yet but I love the pattern, and am wearing my chunky purple tam!

Spinning Columbia wool roving on Cadorette Canadian Production spinning wheel

Moar Columbia!

Yes, I am still on this purple kick!  Sheepspot‘s handdyed Columbia roving is now all spun up, and I now have 310 yards of 2-ply yarn from the 119 g.  It was both spun & plied on my CPW.

 


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Living a little and crafting a lot – knits, spins and even weaving!

The past month took me home for a sad occasion with family.  It has meant working harder to get ready for the holidays ahead but I came back deeply grounded.

Bougainvillea new growth after coming indoors

Her late blooms and new leaves are a wonder

On the flight south, I took out my new Ampersand sock-in-progress… only to find out that my seat-mate was also a knitter!  She had holiday knits on the go, and I got down to the foot with this lovely Indigodragonfly merino yarn as we knit along with each other.

 

Indigodragonfly fingering weight handdyed yarn

‘Who’s a Happy Tribute?’ colourway from the Knitter’s Frolic

A better blogger would have the actual sock project to share, I know.  This is the trouble with major disruptions & terrible seasonal lighting around here – not for everyone but if you are me the photography it suffers.

Catching us Up (a bit)!

You were missed, as I was propelled forward.  This is only the tip of what’s been happening while I was away from posting.

Antique saxony spinning wheels in a hatchback vehicle

We can call the wheels at home a herd now.

Only a couple days before our sad news was delivered, I had another trip to visit Alvin & Barbara Anne Ramer. Alvin repaired my antique William McDonald wheel while I cough fell in love with the smaller wheel in the foreground cough.  The separation of this metal pin and an old fix to her treadle bar needed attention.

 

Broken treadle pin on antique Nova Scotia flax spinning wheel

You can imagine my horror

Alvin fixed this main problem, and he also made other adjustments to the wheel.  It was awesome to see him in good health & at his wheel-smith work.  Barbara Anne was so gracious as well, and I loved speaking more with her about spinning, weaving and her plans.

Blue Faced Leicester/Silk yarn spun on antique spinning wheel on niddy noddy

First spun on the early C19 Nova Scotia wheel

The first spin is 646 yards (127g) of BFL wool/silk.  It was all plied on my Watson Martha wheel in double drive.

Last Thursday, I used this yarn for a great dye experiment with Madder root.  The mordant is alum @ 8% and cream of tartar @ 7%.  I brought the 100g of ground Madder with 1 tbsp of baking soda up to a simmer, and cooled overnight.

Madder dye bath preparation

Straining madder root from dye liquor!

Further tweaking happened in the morning after straining, and I mordanted handspun Dorset (horned) wool yarn for the legendary exhaust baths.

Natural dye with Madder root on handspun yarn

Home-dyeing with Madder root!

This operation was surprisingly fragrant!  The madder has a nutty, smoky aroma.  After rinsing & drying, I have rich oranges – and the exhaust material/bath in reserve!

Natural dyed handspun yarns using Madder and alum mordant

Madder’s fall bounty!

Although I strained & rinsed thoroughly small specks of the ground dyestuff are scattering from the skeins.  It’s no big deal at all but is a side-effect!

Handspun Falkland wool dyed in black walnut, antique wheel spinning

Walnut-dyed Falkland handspun yarn

The McDonald antique wheel was also a joy for spinning my Falkland top that is dyed with black walnut.  The 5.9 oz gave me 593 yards of 2-ply.  This time I changed ratios on the Watson Martha but still plied in double drive.

Spindles, loom & knits

All have been in rotation since I recovered from the time away.  These are just quick out-takes (in no particular order) while I keep gaining on deadlines.

Spinning organic handdyed Polwarth wool with a Tabachek drop spindle

Cedar Tabachek with organic Polwarth

The dyed-by Sheepspot spinning project is down to the last 44g of Polwarth wool.  Having the cedar Tabachek drop spindle in regular use again has made me so happy.  My plan is to chain-ply this yarn when it is all spun up.

Spinning batts from Enting Fibercraft on Bosworth Moosie drop spindle

Oceanside Ent Batts for a Moosie WIN!

These batts by Naomi at Enting Fibercraft are amazing.  Four breeds of wool are blended with Tussah silk & Bamboo rayon.  The colour is so deep, and the blend is just fabulous on my Moosie spindle.

Handwoven cotton kitchen towels in Keep it Simple pattern

Learning curve & humble pie to mix metaphors!

These towels stretched me so much.  The red one is unwashed.  A mistake that glared at my friend Diane in the top towel got corrected thanks to her kind pointing-out.  They need pressing, hemming and documenting but they certainly have happened!

Baby Surprise Jacket, newborn size in Heritage Handpaints by Cascade

Another Baby Surprise Jacket!

A lace-edged hat, and booties went with this Baby Surprise Jacket for my cousin.  Her shower was this past Sunday, and we can’t wait to see her baby outfitted in the knits!


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Building the yarn flavour

This story happened on one of those rare summery fall days, September 5, 2013.  Life runs far more smoothly now that I, daughter of Jamaica, have learned to never take fair weather for granted in the northern hemisphere.  “Make hay while the sun shines” seriously resonates here.

Extraordinary gift – Black Walnut dye liquor

When September 5th spoke, I listened.  It said, “Grab Evil Michelle’s Black Walnut from this June, and have at it!”

Natural dyeing is not for everyone, I know.  As Sasha (thecraftyrabbit) put it on Saturday at the Woodstock Fleece Festival, “It’s too much like cooking!”  YES!  And we laughed.  N’s take is that I really did not get enough science in school.  They are both correct.

Finnish Landrace wool top, wet

Taking the jar on the left, i.e. 15 oz of “first soak,” I appraised mine stash.  Turns out, I had lots of candidates to get in on this half of the Black Walnut gift.

Handspun, not to be left out of dye day

It was a carefully weighed plan.  The dry weight of fibre totaled 15 oz to equal the glorious Black Walnut dye.  L→R we had variety: flax/wool blend; a silk hankie’s worth and; wool/mohair/alpaca blend handspun yarns.  They all soaked in water for an hour.

Heating the Black Walnut dye liquor

It’s true that the (so not) Evil Michelle let me sail past the messy part of preparing the husks.  Still, I heeded the words of Elizabeth Fahey in the Fall 2010 issue of Spin-Off:

…As we handle the fresh nuts and husks, our hands are stained dark brown and our fingernails are black.  The substantive dye in the black walnut husk is ready to ooze out and stain anything it touches.  This is the dye that is my delight…

Between the family wedding, and my formica counters, I decided the best plan was to dye outdoors for once.  The aha! moment was when I realized the gas BBQ was my heat source!

Walnut dye magic in the making

Now, my patience has its limits.  I needed something else to do outside while heating, dyeing and cooling was under way.  That’s how I came to:

Add value to an eBay Purchase

Vintage line flax from Pennsylvania

Hidden deep in my stash was this 6.8 oz/ 192 g of vintage flax.  You know when you make “just one bid” late at night on eBay?  That.

Naturally, my ears perked up when Harriet Boon demonstrated how you improve on flax this June at the Ontario Handspinning Seminar.  Putting not-great flax through a hackle helps immensely. Traditional processing involves 6 – 10 passes between finer & then finer hackles (The Intentional Spinner, p. 14).  Did the Pennsylvanian farm have access to so much equipment before this flax got bundled and hung in an attic?

Before re-hackling: vintage Pennsylvania flax bundles

I came away from the Seminar understanding better than before these 2 important principles:

  1. Short of mold or fire, sound flax never dies – it is a timeless fibre; and
  2. Well prepared fibres offer a better spinning experience.

It was worth a try – this flax had not been through industrial equipment, and took a huge amount of labour over time to be produced.  Plus, my Forsyth fine stationary comb looks a lot like a hackle.

A mini hackle!

Warning:  don’t use a kitchen chair with any array of sharp, stainless steel tines.  Really.  That would be unsafe.  I don’t recommend it at all – ever.

The how:  I lashed each bundle of flax by hand, and pulled through the tines.  The moving comb is just pinning that bundle down.

First, second and third pass vintage flax

What happened was stunning.  Each of 3 passes sent chaff, dust, and brittle pieces of stem flying.  The fibres literally lightened and shone.  The first pass gave the longest fibres, and yielded 4.9 oz/ 127g.  The second pass gave 18 g, and the third 12g.  Tow that didn’t fly away was 27 g, and I kept that too.

Grades of line flax with tow after re-hackling

The Black Walnut dyeing was so fantastic that I decided to finally tackle the onion skins next.  I soaked 160g of skins overnight.  The 50 g of handspun merino, and 31g Tussah silk top got alum & cream of tartar mordant overnight as well.

Walnut dyed Finn wool, and onion skin dyed Tussah silk

The onion skins gave a surprisingly vibrant colour but spots of the silk top resisted the dye in its bundle.

Walnut dyed handspun skeins

The Horned Dorset skein (right, overhang) was 48g dry.  I dyed it a few days later in the exhaust bath.

Onion skins helping merino along

This was my first time dyeing commercially prepared fibre.  The Tussah silk top looks a bit compacted but should be spinnable.

Jamaican Yellow Ginger root (turmeric)

Dad brought me this bag of lovely yellow ginger.  As long ago as August 2012, I worked with a small amount of this dye with really strong results.

It is first cured by boiling, dried for a week, chopped and then ground – a lot of work!  I got a granite mortar & pestle from a local Home Goods store.

Horned Dorset handspun, natural dye

The Horned Dorset yarns are slowly making their way into a colourwork project!  I started the dye process this Monday by curing the new batch of Jamaican Yellow Ginger.

Curing Jamaican Yellow Ginger (turmeric) for dyeing

The roots are so fragrant.  Sasha’s right:  this is like cooking.  I am learning how to build the flavour of my yarn in different ways, that’s all.


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One thing in common

Lately, I have let the spirit move me.  Getting past ambitious ideas that were keeping me back.  Also past old habits of deference with people in my life.  The silly notions fell away, and something important has started to happen.  For one thing, I started a sweater on July 2nd.  A short and largely disappointing summer turned out of its skeins and into a garment that I will be proud to wear.

The yarn was upstairs since it came out of successive cochineal dye baths last August 25th.  The 25g of cochineal that taught me what its “medium shades of the colour range” might be.  Pink – each exhaust tinted.  This year 2 competing ideas rented space in my brain:  (a) overdye it now; (b) monochrome acrobatics on the needles.

I am not entirely clear on what brought me back to handspun sweater knitting on July 2nd.  Sure, I was laid up, and it’s been a cool summer but what exactly led me to Sarah Swett‘s “Everyday Striped Cormo Shirt” design?  Self-care is part of it, surely.  As is a need to draw on the sparks that created what I wrote down as 1,528.84 yds with two red ink lines underneath.

This simple design perfected over what Sarah wrote is her “series of everyday handspun clothing.”  The exemplar described by Sarah succinctly as:

Fine yarn and a loose gauge give it drape; seamless construction makes it easy to put on and take off; a close but by no means tight, fit means it is so comfortable I can hardly tell it is on.  And the stripes? They’re just fun.

My haggard (I remember July 2nd well) brain probably just remembered Sarah’s spring workshop.  I learned there how powerful simple ideas carried to execution really can be.  Sarah wore and spoke about her striped shirt as she taught the class.  Something brought this all together.  Plus, the one size given as 36″ bust would fit.  My yarn gave a close enough gauge, and I would juggle the light pink like nobody’s business, right?  Right.

The stripes were fun.  I learned Meg Swansen’s jogless jog.  My version is knit with U.S. size 6 needles.  Looking closely you can trace my improving attitude toward the end.  See the short cast-on at the lower edge?  I was in no mood to pull it out & start over.  Increases happened later.  Immediately after which we have the Yardage Be Damned phase, i.e. a K2, P1 ribbing, and also that extra inch in the body.  It really is the same knitter who then goes off-pattern and drops her 1st steeked neck.

Neck secured for steeking

I used Meg Swansen & Amy Detjen’s crochet method in Knitting with Two Colors to secure the 3 steek stitches.  It was a very deep breath before I cut.  Instead of casting 20 stitches off for the neck, I held them on scrap yarn.  On the next round I cast 6 stitches on by the backwards loop method.

All’s well that ends well – steeked scoop neck for handspun

This was what Elizabeth Zimmerman called a “kangaroo pouch neck.”  My motivation was simply that I wanted to continue knitting in the round, and Maggie Righetti has very hard words for casting-off neck stitches in any event:  Sweater Design in Plain English.

Apart from ends being woven in, armholes joined and blocking, I finished a sweater in exactly a month at an unusual time of year.  Sarah Swett has given the spinning community the fruits of her working a simple idea to perfection.  I loved every stitch.  Such an elegant solution for my surprisingly pink yarns.

What else I hath wrought

This beautiful Border Leicester x Corriedale pin-drafted roving is a gift from a friend.  It’s 15 oz beautifully processed by Morro Fleece Works, and yesterday I broke into it for real.

Gift fibre takes shape

A very satisfying 161 yds turned out by the Spinolution Mach 2.  As I will maintain to anyone who asks, the Mach 2 is a fine wheel for what it does.  This yarn a dye-pot candidate – black walnut, I think.

Willful Hebridean wool

Yes, willful.  The Hebridean rolags got together & decided they would be opposing-ply when they grew up.  Either that or the Watson Martha has a mind of her own.  The 54 yds is 2 plies spun right; 1 spun left, and plied left.  All singles were spun supported long-draw, so we have my first woolen opposing ply, apparently!

The BFL x Shetland roving for these 3-ply yarns all came from Hopeful Shetlands.  It’s further proof that Beth really did teach me how to spin long-draw last spring!  All singles were spun on my Watson Martha – brown in February & grey in August – and plied on a lower ratio.  The 305 yds may not be enough for a Rasta tam that I promised to make but it would be lovely.

The Humblest Linen Washcloth

It was fascinating to knit up the small linen skeins.  They are from tow flax spun on Wee Peggy for Harriet Boon’s class at this June’s Ontario Handspinning Seminar.  The more I ripped back the better the yarn was to knit with!  Such a rustic piece of cloth but I really enjoyed knitting on it.

Morning Glory emerging

Slowly but surely.  That’s all I can say about all of these things.  Slowly but surely.

Hand-combed Romney wool

 


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The fun part

Our first-ever giveaway is ready for her drum roll!  Winners are:

Chronicbooker3, Shelley! You win the woven project bag!

Cristaldiva, Rayna!  Tosh Sock in Logwood is yours!

Many thanks to each & every one of you who posted, and tweeted.  Your comments & wishes were lovely.  The support is from long-time readers, and means a lot to me.

Rayna, please contact me at irieknit at gmail dot com, and I will send your skein to you!  I know where to find Shelley.

Big thanks to Beth too

Southern Cross!

Beth very kindly gave me my first Southern Cross Fibre experience.  Two braids of superwash merino wool top  ‘Sugar and Spice’ from their August 2011 Fibre Club that popped out of her super-duper stash cupboard into my lap.

How it got spun — with glee; on my Watson Martha in scotch tension; each braid is a straight single spun right; plied left.  Worsted all the way. A gift of 756 yds.  For weaving?  Perhaps a VIP baby?

Thank you, Beth!  The colours are so gorgeous, and I loved every last bit of this spin.  I showed it off at our Guild meeting this week to some fanfare!

Ever looked down to see this?

Not a cat bed

Pin-drafted roving in a nicely lined basket.  That would be Sir Melvin’s “What?!” look.  Guess who won that argument?

Hot off the bobbin – Columbia 4-ply handspun yarn

I spun the singles long-draw in 2 sittings on May 4th and June 16th on my Cadorette CPW.  It was the best pairing of wool-to-Quebec wheel to date.  Each ply is 2 oz.  I took the drive band off the bobbin, moved the wheel to the far side of the room, and wound onto a cardboard roll with dowel cores.

A wheel with 1 bobbin is no impediment to serious use.  It took me 2 sittings, and no extra kit to spin 4 bobbins full.  That’s 247 yards of 4-ply yarn.  Winding-off by hand goes quickly, and lets the twist move around before it sets in the single.  It was spun DD, and with my zoned-out abandon, so redistributing extra twist is for the good of the end product.

The cardboard rolls + dowel go onto my Will Taylor lazy kate, and feed smoothly for plying.

Sproing, defined

The CPW is a wheel that I am growing into, and just love for what it can do.

As the yarn sat around, I slowly got a pretty good idea going about its future.  On Thursday this led me to bring January’s Logwood bath out for inspection.

No secret – I love the Logwood

In freshening the exhaust with new Logwood chips, I got this stunning blue.  It really is blue!

Sproing improvement

Fleece happens

My over-arching plan on this has to do with the Birthday Fibre.  What Birthday Fibre, you ask?

Border Leicester raw wool

This fleece is from a 2 year old Border Leicester sheep at Lambs Quarters Farm in Holstein, Ontario.  Finding new spinners’ flocks is one of the main draws for me at the Ontario Handspinning Seminar.

Cleaned locks in the sun

My plan for this fleece is to build on what I learned at Sarah Swett’s workshop last month – blending wool for value.  This is my first real attempt at dyeing locks – when the Logwood is clear, I will bring out the Black Walnut liquor.

The back office

This is my first post using Flickr to host my blog photos.  I am changing over from Google, and ask you to please give feedback if there are any problems on your end.

The changes in Google photo hosting are deal-breakers.  It comes down to unilateral withdrawal of capability with no explanation, and no ability to be heard as a customer.  It is ludicrous, even more so because we pay an annual fee for extra storage.

The irony is that my irieknit handle was refused under the former Google+ rules.  Under the new dispensation, I have no choice in the matter.  I will keep the email account but shifting my Google+ footprint feels onerous – I may do it for uniformity but am undecided at this point.

 


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In with the new – a floor loom!

The idea that I could weave came about quite simply but over a long dash of time.  Exposure to all of you weavers helped but it came down to an awareness that in changing my life has room for more.

Hemp and two flaxes – handspun yarns

Spinning flax, hemp and cotton helped the scales fall from my never-going-to-weave eyes.  Each yarn evokes a memory of cloth I grew up with, know and love.  Woven all.

Spinning cotton for khadi

The Great Wall of Never finally broke down last year.  I quietly wrote & saved 1 line:  my goal is to learn to weave before I am 40.  In what has been essentially uncertain times, I needed that space & focus.

Commission knitting and backstrap weaving both dovetailed in the past year.  Not only could weaving enhance any business purpose but I love the rhythm.  This work challenges me in entirely new ways.

A loom bench as it arrived!

In the days before the Sarah Swett Workshop my slow search for a floor loom crystallized.  Beth very kindly let me know that her Schacht Mighty Wolf was for sale – all 8 shafts of it.  We discussed all the terms ahead of the trip, and I did my best due diligence on what the local market had to offer.  So many (including Beth) helped us come to a decision.  Margaret, Nancy, Cheryl & Sasha in particular listened to all the options, and gave such solid advice.

Weaving studios don’t have midnight blue walls

Melvin was very much involved in the long-overdue paint job for this room.  It had to happen & it had to happen quickly!  Hence my silence last week.

All the better to see the world!

As you might have heard me say on Twitter, I was worried that a primer coat would not be enough!  Man, did I hate that wall colour!  It’s finally gone.

Same view, different day

After researching on-line, I chose Benjamin Moore’s HC-173 called “edgecomb gray.”  This room gets full sun in the morning & barely any after noon.  Some colour cuts the glare, and with the deep blue living underneath, I may just have achieved a neutral gray.

Mighty Wolf loom closed

The main contender in my deliberations was an 8-shaft cherry Norwood listed on the Toronto Craigslist.  It came with 30″ weaving width.  The sellers were absolutely wonderful about answering my questions, and were very flexible for a potential viewing.

Schacht Mighty Wolf open in my room

Last Friday, N & I went to pick the loom up, spend the afternoon with Beth & have dinner with friends on the way home.  So, biggest piece of equipment ever & still feeling completely right!  She’s a 1988 loom, originally owned by Jillian Moreno.  I am the 3rd in her life of going from one friend’s home to another.  No storage time for this baby – she has been woven on & loved.  Thanks to the workshop, we were all together when I told Beth YES, please!

Loom & some stash containment at home

The major pluses as I saw them were its folding x-frame, that the loom is still in production, and the extra 6″ of weaving width.  I would be lying if I didn’t also tell you that the loom’s history, and patina played a big role.  Schachts are desirable but not that common in our area (LeClerc country as I like to call it).  It really was sitting at her bench that Saturday night that let me know this was the best loom that I could afford.

Reorganized for stash

This is my combination 11th anniversary & birthday present.  More than all of that it’s a milestone – I did something big for myself and have my work cut out for me.  Family, you all made it possible.  As I told the agent at the border, “Crazy that a Jamaican would be getting a loom today!”  It is, and so many of you readers are to thank for helping me get there.

My first boat shuttle

Thank you, Beth – for extra time, my first boat shuttle being so pretty, and extra everything.  I will work hard at learning how to weave on this great loom.

Homework

One Must be Generous with Fibre

Also at Beth’s were these 2 mason jars of walnut dye liquor.  A wonderful gift from She Who Cannot be Named – Thank you, M!

For my dyeing pleasure!

Other spinny elves have been equally generous to me as well.

Southern Cross sw Merino & Border Leicester x Corrie

Sasha averred on Twitter the other day that, “One must be generous with fiber.”  Both gifts are making me very happy.  On the one hand, I get to spin my first Southern Cross Fibres on Martha thanks to an elf.  On the other hand, I have 15 oz of the Border Leicester/ Corrie cross that is beautiful pin-drafted roving from Morrow Fleece Works thanks to another elf.  I started to spin it lightly with my Forrester Akha-style spindle.

Melvin’s former BFF – Cheviot roving

In exchange for the pin-drafted dream, I snuck out Melvin’s most favorite fibre ever – Cheviot roving that P. Hinton donated to our Guild.  A word on my sample findings for that Cheviot…

Cheviot on the CPW

… not only is it popular with the cat but it didn’t much like my high-twist hiding experiment on the CPW.  Just so you know, I forgot to mention that my dear!

(edit to fix picture)


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New look, and happy yarns

 

Welcome!  It’s been a long time in coming – I changed the blog’s theme.  Hope you enjoy the new look & also the better compatibility with your small-screen devices.

Also sporting a new look: purpleheart Bossie

I also updated the About page to better reflect what I do, and also give some co-ordinates.  Over the past 4+ years of writing this blog my interests have evolved but the TKK format/skin has stayed largely static.  Here’s to getting more function, and also to letting readers in on the secret that I do now take spin/ knit commissions.

 

This uber-bright handspun yarn is really & truly natural dyed.  The yarn was cream Finn top from Louet that I dubbed the Sweater-in-Waiting in this post.  I used 25g of ground, dried cochineal. This was my 1st (and only) cochineal experiment.  The mordants are alum & cream of tartar.

Here is how I got the surprising fuchsias.  With a dried weight of the whole 1,529 yards at 547g, I had under 5% dyestuff.  The label said as little as 3% would give medium shades.  Pro-tip, friends: medium shades of cochineal?  That would be your fuchias!  I decided to go for a tinted gradient.  This meant dyeing in thirds through the successive exhaust baths.

There’s a subtle tint.  If anything about this yarn can be called subtle?  I am gathering courage, and will let you know when casting-on happens.  EvilMichelle says that I really should.

 

Far less eventful yarns

Just so you know that it’s not all fluorescent all the time, here is a much calmer spin.

Caribbean clouds Polwarth

This 356 yds of Polwarth 4-ply handspun started out life as 8 0z of Miss Babs’ “Cloud #9”.  I broke each braid at the mid-point, and spun from the break out using Martha in DD.

Both the singles and the ply are high-twist.  It was one of those early March weeks when I needed that kind of a spinning workout.

Equally swift and satisfying is this Columbia pin-drafted roving spin on the CPW.  It’s spun long-draw, and I have 8 oz total from Morgaine who had Harvey’s fleece prepped by Morro Fleece Works.  The roving is a real pleasure – next to no VM, and light as a feather!

Bleeding heart in bloom

When I return, there will be big news of the loom variety.  I am still processing this & the wonderful Sarah Swett workshop weekend that I went to in Michigan.  They go hand-in-hand!